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Help With Your Putting

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We’re back to four line poems with a focus on putting.

I’m sure that most of you have missed a putt and then later thrown down a second ball on the same spot and made that one. The poem below suggests a way to incorporate this experience into your putting routine.

Putting Help

To improve your putting without a doubt
And avoid the usual pain and chagrin
Pretend you’ve already putted and missed
Your “second try” will always go in.

Leon S White, PhD

With Father’s Day coming soon, let me suggest the most unexpected and entertaining gift you could select: One of my two soft-cover books, Golf Course of Rhymes – Links between Golf and Poetry Through the Ages or Opposite in Golf – Portrayed in Poetry as Opposed to Prose. Both are available on Amazon. Thanks for taking a look.

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Golf Secrets not Intel

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For the past four weeks I have posted four line poems. I plan to continue. However, since “secrets” are in the news, I thought I would interrupt the four line poems in favor of a poem that I wrote recently called “Golf Secrets.” 

GOLF SECRETS

Google “golf secrets” and what do you get?
Over 30 million sites to explore
All these “secrets” which are anything but
Guaranteed to lower your score!

Putting secrets, more than a few
Secrets that help with your short game as well
But why are all the experts who know them
So ready, willing  and eager to tell?

Full swing secrets are most numerous
And come in endless variety
Some intended to let you hit straighter
Others claiming to reduce anxiety. 

 The pros, I suppose, all believe in secrets
Untold thoughts that let them excel
Hogan kept his quiet the longest
Until semiretired he would not tell.

He finally did reveal his secret
In ’55 as Herb Wind reported
Not sure how many have understood
The details being descriptively contorted.

It may be that “secrets” is really a code word
A way of dressing up all those golf tips
Like calling a common seafood concoction
Something more esoteric than fish and chips.

But the problem is with all the secrets
That drowned us golfers from Jan to December
When out on a course and in need of help
We know there’s one, but just can’t remember.

Leon S White, PhD

(The “Herb Wind” referred to in the 5th stanza is Herbert Warren Wind, one of the top three golf writers of the 20th century. He wrote mostly for the New Yorker Magazine, but shifted to Sports Illustrated from 1954 -1960. Wind wrote at least one golf poem. Search under his name to find it and more information about Wind.)

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Par Four Golf Poems – 4: Gift Horse

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On this Blog, for the past three weeks, I have published four line golf poems with a similar characteristic: the last word of the third line is the same as the first word of the fourth line.

That’s Golf 

Step up to the ball
Stance just so wide
Swing with abandon
Abandon your pride.

Reality 

To the first tee
With the driver you trust
Follow your plan
Plan to adjust.

Thoughts

Game under water
Voices of dread
Running on empty
Empty your head.

I’ve written one more that is relevant but not limited to golf.

Gift Horse

When favored by luck
Don’t take a pass
Find the next step
Step on the gas.

Leon S White, PhD

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Par Four Golf Poems – 3: Thoughts

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We continue this week with another four line poem, this one titled “Thoughts.” I’d be interested in yours after you read/recite it.

Thoughts

Game under water
Voices of dread
Running on empty
Empty your head.

Leon S White, PhD

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Par Four Golf Poems: The Reality of Golf

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This week’s four line poem (Par 4 poem) uses just 15 words to delineate the essence of golf.

Reality

To the first tee
With the driver you trust
Follow your plan
Plan to adjust.

Leon S White, PhD

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Par Four Golf Poems – 1

A. B. Frost

Those of you who are familiar with this blog and are reading it on your browser (and not as an email) know that you can scroll down to read other posts as well as this one. You can also use the information on the right of the screen to search and find other posts. I hope that many of you have the time to do this.

But being a realist, I know that often visitors have little time. With this in mind, I am launching a series of four line poems (I call them Par Four Golf Poems) for those of you who enjoy golf poetry, but have time constraints. For at least the next month, I will try to add one each week. Any comments would be appreciated.

Here is the first one:

That’s Golf

Step up to the ball
Stance just so wide
Swing with abandon
Abandon your pride.

Leon S White, PhD

 

 

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The Rules of Golf – A Reprise

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Earlier this year we learned that the USGA and the R & A are proposing a sweeping change in the Rules of Golf. Starting, I believe, in 2019, the current 34 Rules would be reduced to 24. I don’t claim that my poem (below) published in my eBook, If Only I Could Play That Hole Again (2013) had any influence on the decision. But I thought the poem was worth reprinting. I am particularly happy with what I wrote in the last stanza. 

THE RULES OF GOLF

The Rules of Golf are not to be broken;
Nevertheless, sometimes they are,
By Pros who should know when to invoke them,
Even when they are close to bizarre.

There are Rules for playing the ball as it lies,
And Rules that relate to the putting green,
Rules for a ball, moved, deflected or stopped,
And others related to “lift, place and clean.”

The Rule Book’s first subject, Etiquette,
Says bunker raking should be in your plans,
But that brings up a delicate subject:
What if no rake and the prints made by fans?

Remember that towel? An unneeded addition,
Placed on the ground somewhat in advance
Of a shot hit from a kneeling position,
For which Stadler got caught for “building a stance.”

And what of the famous scorecard debacle,
When De Vicenzo got himself in a jam.
Caught up in the moment, he missed the error,
His quote when informed, “What a stupid I am . . .”

After Inkster, call it the doughnut rule,
Which has nothing to do with bringing ’em.
But if you’re a Pro, waiting out a delay,
Better refrain from swinging ’em!

“Local” rules may also exist.
Just like the rest, they couldn’t be clearer,
Except when the Pros fail to peruse them,
Because they are posted on some bathroom mirror.

Surely the Pros know the rules in the Rule Book
Still they get DQ’ed for the craziest things.
Remember poor Furyk, late for a Pro/Am
When his cell phone alarm logged zero rings!

Penalties are sometimes imposed by officials,
Walking along and right on the scene.
But now they are aided by enterprising viewers,
Vigilantes with Rule Books watching the screen.

Has all this complexity made the game better?
Maybe the Rules need some serious rethinking.
In the early days, thirteen were plenty,
A judicious review might lead to some shrinking!

 Leon S White, PhD

[The incident referred to in the third stanza (previously cited in an earlier Clerihew) was where in the 2010 PGA Championship Dustin Johnson was penalized for grounding his club in a bunker that did not appear to be a bunker. In the sixth stanza, Julie Inkster was disqualified for swinging a club weighted with a donut while waiting on a tee because of slow play ahead of her.]

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Games People Play

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I wrote these six line a while ago. The poem is included in my book, Golf Course of Rhymes – Links between Golf and Poetry Through the Ages (available on Amazon). 

GAMES PEOPLE PLAY

Golf is a game
To be played honestly
But not too seriously.

Politics is a game
To be played seriously

But not too honestly.

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A Little Golf

Here is a poem that should make any avid golfer smile and nod in agreement:

A LITTLE

A little learning so ’tis said,
Is dangerous for any head. 
A little wisdom, tipped with wit,
Will rarely fail to make a hit.
A little golf, ’twas said of late,
Will benefit the delicate.
At which some wise one had his fling:
“A little golf? There’s no such thing.”

Francis B. Keene.

For the avid golfer, the feelings expressed in these eight lines are easy to identify with. What might be surprising is that Francis Keene published this poem in the March 1900 issue of the magazine Golf.

Golf has change a lot in the last 117 years. No one will argue with that statement. But what the old poems featured in this Blog show, often with eloquence and wit, is that the feelings of a true golfer, who loves playing the game, have changed very little over time.

One caveat: For this New England golfer, in January even a little golf would be welcome.img-21

 

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A Golfer’s New Year’s Wish

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 A Golfer’s New Year’s Wish

                           That
       “One bad shot after another”
         Does not come to describe
              The next four years.

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